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Douglas Ingram
Founder, President and CEO
LCT Inc.
12700 Fair Lakes Circle
Suite 350
Fairfax, Va. 22033
(703) 802-9860
Fax: (703) 802-9880
www.lctech.com

Douglas Ingram's company has grown from an idea to a $4.5 million business in 12 years through strong client relationships and the good old fashioned word-of-mouth. LCT, formerly known as Life Cycle Technology Corp., provides consulting and integration services to commercial, federal and state and local customers.

The company's key software product automates the contract proposal process, which Ingram said can cut a company's time and labor by 50 percent. LCT's commercial and state and local clients generate 90 percent of its revenue; the remainder comes from federal customers.

LCT currently has 40 employees and Ingram plans to add 10 more by the end of this year. Ingram expects LCT's revenues to hit $6 million by the end of this year.

The privately held company has managed to attract clients like Armonk, N.Y.-based IBM Global Services, Fairfax County, Va., and the city of Philadelphia.

LCT's presence in the federal market consists of partnerships with large integrators like Bethesda, Md.-based Lockheed Martin Corp. and Unisys Corp. of Blue Bell, Pa. LCT is providing engineering services as a subcontractor to Unisys on the Department of Transportation's Information Technology Omnibus Procurement.

Ingram has no plans to change the company's business mix. In the next year, he plans to continue generating the bulk of the company's revenues from commercial and state and local markets. Revenues from the federal market will also remain the same, he said.

"We expect that we'll win large contracts in the commercial market," said Ingram. "The way that we get commercial contracts is through relationships."

Ingram's industry experience includes a nine-year career at IBM's federal systems division in Bethesda, Md. and a three-year career as a vice president of systems engineering for PRC Inc. in McLean, Va.

He said he started the company to get away "from the same old stuff" and to have the opportunity to do something outstanding.

"I had no business plan, no money and no funding," said Ingram. "All I had was the belief that I could really do this."

- Tania Anderson


Copyright 1998 Post-Newsweek Business Information, Inc. All rights reserved

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