Chopra calls RFP process ineffective for health IT

CTO wants "face-to-face" time between government, vendors

Federal Chief Technology Officer Aneesh Chopra hopes to facilitate more “face-to-face” time between health information technology vendors and government officials as part of the health IT incentives being developed through the Health and Human Services Department, according to commentary by Input, a market research firm in Reston, Va..

Chopra wants to facilitate more vendor input into solutions being developed for government health IT by avoiding traditional requests for proposals (RFPs) and trying out new Web applications similar to DefenseSolutions.gov, according to an Input blog entry on June 10.

“Throughout Chopra's speech he focused on the ineffectiveness of the current [RFP] process that has become commonplace in the government-contracting world. He indicated that innovation by RFP is silly because RFPs stifle innovation with long lists of requirements,” wrote Kristina Mulholland, the company's health care and social services analyst.

Chopra outlined his ideas for health IT procurement innovations in a government health IT conference held June 5 by the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society.

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

Reader Comments

Mon, Jun 22, 2009 j Howard

Quick Fix

You mean, take the Defense Acquisition University (DAU) basic courses on types of acquisition? I don't agree. He is not being simple.

The government chooses the type of acquisition, but generally an SOO takes more time, when the org is unclear on what it's sees the needs and objectives are. (SOO requires detailed knowledge to understand and compare the offered solutions approaches).

Chopra is right. An RFP is a qualifying process of the solution and solution provider. We need a yearly pre-qualifying round (not an IDIQ) for all HIT providers so we don't keep writing the same management volumes over and over.

If a solution provider performed well on 1) a named IDIQ equivalent, and 2) in HIT generally, and 3) in PPIRd then a yearly round could maintain the currency of qualifications. (large IT - Encore, NETCENTS, CMS PITS, etc) then we can develop a "More than a Task Order/less than an RFP" process.

Here is an idea....

Let's call this process QHSP.
- a mini proposal 10 pages
- A BPMN simulation of the proposal execution with orgs, tasks and costs and business process (This is the cost volume and the management volume). This should follow the SE standard process types. (Hey, DoD has uniform joint task lists).
- list of resumes and experience recommended
- and maybe something else
- BPMN historical case data for the SIM and to geenrate the MS-Project schedule
- The gov't could supply a customizable template process thread in BPMN if the expected process is known. Solution providers can be agile in tailoring or strict to the template.

I have seen RFP's on IDIQs with a 10,000 page cost volume. Who does that benefit?

The H is for my last name Howard, and QHSP is Qualified Historical (or Howard) Simulation Proposal.

It's also the first CAPTCHA on this submission.

Mon, Jun 22, 2009 J Howard

You mean, take the Defense Acquisition University (DAU) basic courses on types of acquisition? Sorry, I don't agree with your assessment. He is not being simple.

The government chooses the type of acquisition, but generally an SOO takes more time, when the org is unclear on what it's the needs and objectives are (SOO requires detailed knowledge to understand and compare the offered solutions approaches).

Chopra is right. An RFP is a qualifying process of the solution and solution provider. We need a yearly prequalifying round (not an IDIQ) for all HIT providers so we don't keep writing the same management volumes over and over.

If a solution provider performed well on 1) a named IDIQ equivalent, and 2) in HIT generally, and 3) in PPIRd then a yearly round could maintain the currency of qualifications. (large IT - Encore, NETCENTS, CMS PITS, etc) then develop a "More than a Task Order/less than an RFP" process.

-------------------------------------
Here is an idea....

Let's call this process QHSP.
- a mini proposal 10 pages
- A BPMN simulation of the proposal execution with orgs, tasks and costs and business process (This is the cost volume and the management volume). This should follow the SE standard process types. (Hey, DoD has uniform joint task lists).
- list of resumes and experience recommended
- and maybe something else
- BPMN historical case data for the SIM and to geenrate the MS-Project schedule
- The gov't could supply a customizable template process thread in BPMN if the expected process is known. Solution providers can be agile in tailoring or strict to the template.

I have seen RFP's on IDIQs with a 10,000 page cost volume. Who does that benefit?

The H is for my last name Howard, and QHSP is Qualified Historical (or Howard) Simulation Proposal.

It's also the first CAPTCHA on this submission.

Just a quick thought.

Mon, Jun 15, 2009 Mike Reston, VA

Apparently, Mr. Chopra has never heard of the Statement of Objectives – design specifically to overcome the challenge he cites. Do you think anyone around him can advise him?

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

What is your e-mail address?

My e-mail address is:

Do you have a password?

Forgot your password? Click here
close

Trending

  • Dive into our Contract Award database

    In an exclusive for WT Insider members, we are collecting all of the contract awards we cover into a database that you can sort by contractor, agency, value and other parameters. You can also download it into a spreadsheet. Our databases track awards back to 2013. Read More

  • Navigating the trends and issues of 2016 Nick Wakeman

    In our latest WT Insider Report, we pull together our best advice, insights and reporting on the trends and issues that will shape the market in 2016 and beyond. Read More

contracts DB

Washington Technology Daily

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.