CONTRACT AND BUYERS GUIDES: MC4 Leverages Technologies To Improve Patient Care

By arming medics, doctors and nurses with laptops and handheld devices, patient recording software and medical logistics capabilities, Medical Communications for Combat Casualty Care (MC4) is paving the way for improved patient care in the combat
zone via access to medical information and user-driven ‘best practices’ on the battlefield.

 

To date, MC4 has fielded more than 22,000 systems and trained more than 24,000 deployed healthcare professionals throughout Iraq, Kuwait, Afghanistan, Qatar, Europe and South Korea, leading to the capture of more than 4.5 million electronic health records on the battlefield. Globally, the MC4 system is used to digitally capture medical records in the combat zone, and aid combat commanders by providing a full picture of medical assets and situations.

 

MC4 was created to integrate, field and support a medical information management system for Army tactical medical forces, creating a comprehensive, lifelong electronic medical record for service members, and enhancing medical situational awareness for operational commanders. Headquartered at Fort Detrick, Md., MC4 is under the oversight of Army PEO EIS at Fort Belvoir, Va.

 

Expansion efforts in the last year will impact soldiers for years to come. “By using MC4, electronic patient records are captured in the central DoD clinical data repository facilitating access for all healthcare providers,” said Major General Charles Green, Deputy Surgeon General, U.S. Air Force.



treating soldier“This includes any follow-on care at a VA facility, resulting in better healthcare for our wounded warriors,” he continued. “Commanders are assured their service men and women are provided documented, consistent, high quality care anywhere they are treated.”

 

By providing MC4 to the Air Force, medical personnel working in joint medical environments can exploit already-established training and in-theater support. This successful endeavor has secured the implementation of MC4 in 12 more Air Force facilities in Southwest Asia (SWA) in 2008.

 

MC4’s use in 2007 also spread throughout Europe, reaching Italy and Romania-based Army units, as well as providing the 8th Army with systems in South Korea.

 

Also in 2007, MC4 led two upgrade efforts to provide users with an improved inpatient medical recording system and a new medical logistics management application. The improved inpatient system allows deployed medical providers to send inpatient healthcare information to a central data repository in the U.S., where it can be viewed from anywhere in the world. The upgrade closed a gap in the medical recording process where previously only outpatient medical records were transferable.

 

MC4 also fielded the new MEDLOG system to help medical logisticians manage and maintain their supplies on the battlefront to provide improved usability, security and a more centralized approach to ordering medical supplies.

 

As a result, MC4 has inspired an operational transformation, by providing in-person operational guidance to units to help them learn how to use the system to their advantage. The formation of MC4 Best Business Practices has helped Task Forces 61 and 146 stationed in Iraq, where they implemented MC4 Best Business Practices and prepared standard operating procedures for incoming units. This effort created a new standard for all units documenting patient care using MC4, and improved the quality of data recorded, resulting in improved healthcare for patients in that region.