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COPYRIGHT GROWTH EXPLODES

The U.S. copyright industry is growing twice as fast as the rest of the economy, giving it revenues of $250 billion, generating $53 billion in exports and providing 3 million jobs, according to a study prepared by the Washington-based International Intellectual Property Alliance, whose member companies sell books, movies, software and music.

This study shows that the industry provides 3.78 percent of the United States' gross national product. The study also says the industry has grown 4.6 percent a year from 1987 to 1994, far faster than the 2.3 percent rate for the overall economy.

MERGER MANIA CONTINUES

America Online appears to be trying to buy archrival CompuServe, a move that would give AOL the majority of online subscribers. And Oracle's CEO Larry Ellison is eyeing Apple.

But Microsoft actually closed a big deal: It bought WebTV for $425 million, showing a significant interest in the Internet-through-television market.

SYBASE MANAGER LEAVES TO START RECRUITING FIRM

Patrick Arnone stepped down as vice president and general manager of the Washington-based public sector group for Sybase, which is based in Emeryville, Calif. Arnone plans to form an executive recruiting business in Reston, Va. Bruce Triner, a senior sales manager, has been tapped to replace Arnone.

YEAR 2000 PRICE TAG ESTIMATE RISES

Fixing the federal government's year 2000 problem could cost $5.6 billion - a significant increase from the $2.3 billion estimate federal agencies announced earlier this year, according to Federal Sources Inc., a research firm in McLean, Va.

The study also said that the problem "will pose the largest management challenge ever faced by the federal government."

Federal Sources' estimates are based on costs incurred by the Social Security Administration, the government's lead agency in year 2000 awareness, assessment, renovation, validation and testing.

LEGISLATOR PRODS AGENCIES ON YEAR 200O

Rep. Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y., has drafted a bill to force-march agency chiefs toward a year 2000 solution. Maloney's bill requires that each agency report back by Aug. 1 on their efforts to fix the year 2000 glitch, which could wreck many software applications whose internal calendars can't grasp the difference between 1900 and 2000.

However, Maloney's bill is unlikely to become law, partly because some Republicans oppose her measure.

BIG MONEY CONTRACT FROM GOVERNMENT LANDLORD

InfoPro Inc. of Silver Spring, Md., will provide information systems support to the General Services Administration's Public Buildings Service through a recently awarded, five-year, $20.5 million contract. Under the indefinite-delivery, indefinite-quantity contract, InfoPro will provide services that cover all aspects of infotech planning, research, evaluation, implementation and support to PBS business lines and staff offices.

Considered the government's landlord, PBS is responsible for all asset manage-
ment support for about 2,000 government-owned and 5,000 leased buildings nationwide. InfoPro is an infotech firm specializing in providing business transaction, network support and software support services.

SHOULD ONLINE REPORTERS GET THE PRIZE?

Raising the question of where online journalists fit into the cadre of print and broadcast scribes, the Pulitzer Prize Board has formed a committee to decide if a new category should be added for that group.

This year, two online submissions were disqualified because they didn't meet requirements for print journalism. They were: The New York Times' "Uncertain Paths to Peace" about Bosnia and "Our Town: Charlotte," an online piece by the Sun Herald of Charlotte Harbor, Fla.

BIG BLUE BOOSTS INTERNET OFFERINGS

Four new World Wide Web hosting solutions introduced this week by IBM Corp., Armonk, N.Y., are the company's response to the growing use of the Internet as a means for firms to outsource business processes.

The offerings range from the Standard, which can serve as introduction to conducting business on the Internet, to the Custom, which can provide services tailored to companies' specific needs.

Depending on customer choices, IBM will provide services such as storage space, bandwidth, security and scalability.
The company said more features and capabilities will be rolled out in the coming months.


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