CSC picks new leader for federal, Sheaffer retires

Computer Sciences Corp.’s new president and CEO, Mike Lawrie, is putting his imprint on the senior management team with several new appointments announced today.

The moves are a key step to executing the company’s turnaround strategy, according to the June 5 CSC announcement.

The leadership appointments include:

David Zolet takes over as president of the North America Public Sector, succeeding James Sheaffer, who will be retiring later this month.

Zolet has served as president of CSC business development for the sector and has held leadership positions at IBM Corp. and Northrop Grumman Corp.

He will be responsible for overseeing NPS operations focused on strengthening cost and profit management disciplines. Zolet will report to Lawrie.

Gary Budzinski is now president of global infrastructure services.

He joins CSC from Hewlett-Packard Co., where he was senior vice president and general manager of HP’s $12 billion technology services business unit.

He also will report directly to Lawrie.

Sunita Holzer has been named chief human resources officer responsible for overseeing all aspects of CSC’s global human resources.

She will join CSC on June 18, reporting directly to Lawrie.

Holzer comes from the Chubb Group for Insurance Companies, where she was chief human resources officer. She has held executive HR positions at GE Capital Corporate, American Express and AIG.

“These individuals were chosen not only for their knowledge and skill, but for their track records in managing key functions during enterprise transformations,” Lawrie said in the announcement. “I am committed to appointing leaders who are decisive, accountable and results-oriented and, above all else — those who uphold a deep sense of values. I look forward to working with these leaders as we move forward with our turnaround strategy to drive the performance our stakeholders expect of CSC.”

CSC, of Falls Church, Va., ranks No. 11 on Washington Technology’s 2011 Top 100 list of the largest federal government contractors.



About the Author

David Hubler is the former print managing editor for GCN and senior editor for Washington Technology. He is freelance writer living in Annandale, Va.

Reader Comments

Tue, Jun 12, 2012

CSC does need a lean organization, but that can be accomplished in part with increased agility by empowering staff while holding them accountable. An example of James Scheaffer's approach to cutting costs was requiring his approval on all overhead travel in excess of $500. For the president of a 16,000 person organization to approve such expenses is crazy. Empowering and holding accountable subordinates will hopefully be the new order. However, a reorganization in the Federal Consulting Practice saw a major reorganization without any discussion with those having knowledge of some of the areas being reorganized. It remains to be seen if the lack of collaboration, and resulting myopic view of the technology world, will impede the new CEO's efforts.

Wed, Jun 6, 2012 Portnoy NY-DC corridor

Interesting appointments, but all of the new people are deeply dipped in government or bureaucratic kinds of fat organizations. CSC needs lean orgs and lean people. They will continue to lose share and have problems with some of their programs, in my opinion.

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