Lockheed finishes census contract on time and under budget

Company processed 165 million forms for 2010 census

Lockheed Martin Corp. processed 165 million 2010 U.S. Census Bureau forms on schedule and under budget, the company has announced.

Lockheed’s Decennial Response Integration System (DRIS) contract was valued at $500 million when it was awarded in 2005. Lockheed was also the prime contractor that developed the information processing system used during the 2000 census, completing 120 million forms with 98 percent accuracy, the company said at the time.

Under the 2010 census contract, Lockheed led a team responsible for the people, processing, technology and infrastructure needed to receive, capture and standardize census data from U.S. residents, and to provide telephone assistance.

During peak periods, the team was able to process 165 million forms, including as many as 2.5 million forms every 24 hours. The Lockheed team also answered 4.4 million telephone inquiries and made 7.4 million calls.

“In complete partnership with the Census Bureau every step of the way, the DRIS team delivered the data accurately and securely, on schedule and under budget,” Julie Dunlap, director of Lockheed Martin’s Census Practice and program manager for the 2010 Census DRIS, said in a news release dated Nov. 1.

The Census Bureau also achieved savings on the 2010 census, announcing in August that it was returning $1.6 billion due to lower-than-expected operational expenses.

Lockheed Martin, of Bethesda, Md., ranks No. 1 in Washington Technology’s 2010 Top 100 list of federal prime federal contractors.

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

Reader Comments

Wed, Nov 3, 2010

I'm just a little curious why a respected Federal contractor completing a contract on time and under budget merits a headline? It would nice for such occurrences to be routine.

Wed, Nov 3, 2010 Michael Salt Lake City, Utah

@ Foster: I believe theLM contract was for $500 Million and they under ran. As I understood it, the $1.6 Billion that was returned to the Treasury's general fund was againts the Department of Commerce's overall Budget for the Census which includes both the LM Contract and all the other funding that DOC got for the 2010 Census inclusive of items like salaries, etc. for the DOC employees and other contracts and contractors in addition to LM. Of course that explanation isn't as pithy or witty as your insightful comment.

Wed, Nov 3, 2010 Foster Huntsville, AL

How did they return 1.6BB on a contract valued at 500MM in 2005? lets see anyone in our newly elected "conservative" congress try and tackle that type of spending....doubtful.

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