IT dominates homeland security market

New research report pegs IT at a 23 percent share

The Homeland Security Department spent $13.1 billion in fiscal 2009 with state and local spending adding another $15.8 billion.

The Homeland Security Research Corp. used those figures from its latest report to argue that state and local spending, which includes first responders, to remind the market that DHS is not the dominant player.

The research firm, based in Washington, D.C., also tried to debunk what it said were misconceptions about homeland security spending.

For example, aviation security has higher visibility and stature but only represents 4.6 percent of the market, while information technology represents 23 percent.

Private-sector spending on homeland security is expected to drop from $11.5 billion in 2009 to $8.5 billion in 2010 before bouncing back to $11.1 billion by 2014.

The U.S. homeland security market, which includes federal, state and local governments; intelligence agencies; and the private sector, will grow from $69 billion 2010 to $85 billion by 2014.

The growth rate stands about 5.1 percent, according to the research firm.


About the Author

Nick Wakeman is the editor-in-chief of Washington Technology. Follow him on Twitter: @nick_wakeman.

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