Full steam ahead

Last Byte | Davies moves quickly to put his stamp on Unisys Federal

Ted Davies, new president of Unisys
Federal Systems, hit the ground running
after being named in October
to replace Greg Baroni, long-time
leader of the unit. The
day after Davies became
president, Unisys Corp.
named Edward Coleman
chairman and chief executive
officer. In days, Davies was
briefing Coleman on his
strategy for the federal market.
In particular, Coleman
wanted an answer to one question: What
does Unisys Federal do best?
Davies spoke recently with Washington
Technology Editor Nick Wakeman.


Q: How did you answer the question about
what Unisys Federal does best?

DAVIES:
I started with innovation. We have a
history of innovation. The first thing is the
ability to come up with new solutions, and the
second thing is our ability to really understand
the client's environment.

We can look at a complex solution, define
what it ought to be, and then operate and
maintain it. Our ability to look at the entire
spectrum is relatively unique.

Q: What kind of direction did Coleman give
you?

DAVIES:
The biggest thing we are trying to
do as a company is continue to deliver worldclass
service to our clients. The next thing is
[to] figure out how to make the business
more successful. Success is defined as growth
and profitability.

But another thing [Coleman] wants from
me is to make sure we are integrated into the
rest of Unisys. We are a $1 billion federal
business but a $5.5 billion company. We need
to build solutions that can be leveraged across
federal and outside of federal as well. We are
doing things that can be exported to governments
around the world and other parts of
the company.

Q: Although Unisys is the incumbent, it had
to file a protest to stay in the competition
for the Transportation Security
Administration's Information Technology
Infrastructure Program contract.
How are you preparing
for the recompete?

DAVIES:
I'm just getting my
arms around TSA, but I can
tell you two things: I've got a
dozen key managers on this
job, and it is a great group.
I'm really impressed with
the way these folks come at
helping TSA meet its mission.

They are mission focused and very focused on
their people. Those are attributes I want.
We are happy we are still in the game [at
TSA]. We have the right people, and we are
delivering for our clients, so we have a good
chance at this.

Q: How are you changing the structure of
Unisys Federal?

DAVIES:
One thing is we named PV Puvvada,
who was our chief technology officer, as managing
partner of solutions innovation. I've
integrated all our horizontal services underneath
him.

Unisys in general is vertically aligned
around three market segments: civilian agencies,
homeland security and defense. We have
account leaders and segment leaders. Their
job is to understand what is going on in their
market. [Puvvada's] role is to cut across all
those segments. For example, what are we
doing well at the General Services Administration,
and how can we leverage that somewhere
else?

We were evolving in this direction, but this
takes it to a new level.

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