Time is ripe for federal procurement reform

Buylines | Policies, strategies and trends to watch

Steve Charles

After reading the Acquisition Advisory Panel's 448-page draft report, it's obvious that this is the playbook for the next era of federal procurement policy and legislation. Just as the Section 800 Panel of the early 1990s presaged the procurement reform legislation of the mid-1990s, so the panel sets the stage for the next round of procurement policy debate and reform.


How much legislation would be required to implement the panel's 80 recommendations? It turns out, very little. Most of the concerns are about government's failure to consistently implement rules, such as:

  • Acquisition planning activities and market surveys are not done properly.
  • Requirements in solicitations are ill-defined.
  • Time and materials contracts are administered without sufficient government surveillance.
  • Interagency contracting programs focus more on awards than on paying attention to required pre-award and post-award activities.
  • There is confusion over competition procedures as shown by "fair notice" for schedules and "fair opportunity" for indefinite-delivery, indefinite-quantity contracts.
  • Performance-based acquisitions lack defined outcomes and meaningful metrics.
    A few of the recommendations would require statutory changes to:
  • Clean up the confusing statutory and regulatory framework of how small-business preference programs are supposed to work.
  • Restore the requirement for all agencies to spend a percentage of procurement dollars on acquisition workforce training.
  • Establish the same legal presumptions for contractors and government regarding "good faith and regularity" in all parts of the contracting process, making the same rules apply to both to the extent allowable by the Constitution and public interest.
But responsibility for most of the recommendations falls squarely on the shoulders of the Office of Management and Budget and its Office of Federal Procurement Policy. They would require those agencies to make changes in policy and guidance in the Federal Acquisition Regulation such as:
  • Restore the definition of commercial services to that of the Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act of 1994, which required the sale of substantial quantities to commercial customers.
  • Develop a governmentwide policy and clauses dealing with organizational conflicts of interest and personal conflicts of interest.
  • Issue more guidance on use of performance-based acquisition and instruction on how to convert time-and-materials contracts to performance-based contracts.
  • Expand "fair opportunity" under Multiple Award Schedule IDIQ contracts to "notify all" eligible contractors.
  • Treat orders for less than $5 million similarly to full-and-open competition as concerns requirements definition, evaluation factors, adequate proposal response time, best value trade-off factors, post-award debriefings and opportunity to protest.
  • Establish a General Services Administration Schedule for services without rates, under which each order would require order level competition.
  • Roll back the definition of commercial services to FASA's statutory definition, which requires sale of substantial quantities to nonfederal customers to determine competitive, commercial pricing.
  • Provide agencies with guidance to authorize creation or expansion of non-governmentwide acquisition contract IDIQ programs, whether they are multiagency contracts or enterprisewide contracts and assisting entities.
  • Complete the OMB survey of all contract vehicles and assisting-services entities to improve transparency on interagency contracting and to establish a baseline for future policy development.
  • Increase quantity and improve quality of procurement data in the Federal Pro-
    curement Data System to capture transactions under MAS contracts.
  • Modify the prohibition on personal services contracts to allow such contracts, but define what the contractor as employer is responsible for doing.
The panel's report thoroughly documents the legislative history and current regulations around all the issues that continue to be highlighted by the oversight community. It is well worth the read for those interested in understanding how the acquisition system works, the pressure points and the tweaks we can expect in the future.


Steve Charles is co-founder of immixGroup, a government business-consulting firm in McLean, Va. E-mail him at Steve_Charles@immixgroup.com.

About the Author

For the past two decades Mr. Charles has helped hundreds of technology manufacturers succeed in the government marketplace. His breadth and depth of expertise on every dimension of the government technology ecosystem provide technology manufacturers with a strategy and clear focus for the greatest success. Mr. Charles is adept at mapping technology product lifecycles and revenue models with appropriate channel and contract vehicle strategies in light of current procurement law, regulations and policy. He receives glowing reviews from the training workshops he facilitates to help sales teams understand the sales tactics needed to address each step in the government acquisition process. Mr. Charles is actively involved in government-industry associations including TechAmerica, ACT-IAC, Coalition for Government Procurement, and the National Contract Management Association. He meets regularly with leaders in government and industry to increase understanding and positive action. Mr. Charles co-authored The Inside Guide to the Federal IT Market, a how-to book for technology companies selling to the government. He is regular contributor to Washington Technology.

Reader Comments

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

What is your e-mail address?

My e-mail address is:

Do you have a password?

Forgot your password? Click here
close
SEARCH
contracts DB

Trending

  • Dive into our Contract Award database

    In an exclusive for WT Insider members, we are collecting all of the contract awards we cover into a database that you can sort by contractor, agency, value and other parameters. You can also download it into a spreadsheet. Read More

  • Is SBA MIA on contractor fraud? Nick Wakeman

    Editor Nick Wakeman explores the puzzle of why SBA has been so silent on the latest contractor fraud scandal when it has been so quick to act in other cases. Read More

Webcasts

  • How Do You Support the Project Lifecycle?

    How do best-in-class project-based companies create and actively mature successful organizations? They find the right mix of people, processes and tools that enable them to effectively manage the project lifecycle. REGISTER for this webinar to hear how properly managing the cycle of capture, bid, accounting, execution, IPM and analysis will allow you to better manage your programs to stay on scope, schedule and budget. Learn More!

  • Sequestration, LPTA and the Top 100

    Join Washington Technology’s Editor-in-Chief Nick Wakeman as he analyzes the annual Top 100 list and reveals critical insights into how market trends have impacted its composition. You'll learn what movements of individual companies means and how the market overall is being impacted by the current budget environment, how the Top 100 rankings reflect the major trends in the market today and how the biggest companies in the market are adapting to today’s competitive environment. Learn More!